Emerson Essay Prudence

Emerson Essay Prudence-29
This delicate dance has been examined by thinkers from Aristotle to Francis Bacon to Thoreau, but none more thoughtfully than by Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803–April 27, 1882).In an essay on the subject, found in his altogether soul-expanding We have a great deal more kindness than is ever spoken.

This delicate dance has been examined by thinkers from Aristotle to Francis Bacon to Thoreau, but none more thoughtfully than by Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803–April 27, 1882).

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How many we see in the street, or sit with in church, whom, though silently, we warmly rejoice to be with! The scholar sits down to write, and all his years of meditation do not furnish him with one good thought or happy expression; but it is necessary to write a letter to a friend, and, forthwith, troops of gentle thoughts invest themselves, on every hand, with chosen words.

What is so delicious as a just and firm encounter of two, in a thought, in a feeling?

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“We live in succession, in division, in parts, in particles.

The instinct of affection revives the hope of union with our mates, and the returning sense of insulation recalls us from the chase.

Thus every man passes his life in the search after friendship, and if he should record his true sentiment, he might write a letter like this, to each new candidate for his love: Dear Friend:— If I was sure of thee, sure of thy capacity, sure to match my mood with thine, I should never think again of trifles, in relation to thy comings and goings.

Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty, to which every part and particle is equally related, the eternal ONE.

And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is all accessible to us, is not only self-sufficing and perfect in every hour, but the act of seeing and the thing seen, the seer and the spectacle, the subject and the object, are one.

I am not very wise; my moods are quite attainable; and I respect thy genius; it is to me as yet unfathomed; yet dare I not presume in thee a perfect intelligence of me, and so thou art to me a delicious torment. Our friendships hurry to short and poor conclusions, because we have made them a texture of wine and dreams, instead of the tough fiber of the human heart.

The laws of friendship are great, austere, and eternal, of one web with the laws of nature and of morals.

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