Essay Glass Menagerie Fire Escape

Essay Glass Menagerie Fire Escape-71
Yet her attachment to these values is exactly what prevents her from perceiving a number of truths about her life.She cannot accept that she is or should be anything other than the pampered belle she was brought up to be, that Laura is peculiar, that Tom is not a budding businessman, and that she herself might be in some ways responsible for the sorrows and flaws of her children.

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Tom—and Tennessee Williams—take full advantage of this privilege.

The story that the play tells is told because of the inflexible grip it has on the narrator’s memory.

For these characters, memory is a crippling force that prevents them from finding happiness in the present or the offerings of the future.

But it is also the vital force for Tom, prompting him to the act of creation that culminates in the achievement of the play.

A play drawn from memory, however, is a product of real experience and hence does not need to drape itself in the conventions of realism in order to seem real.

The creator can cloak his or her true story in unlimited layers of melodrama and unlikely metaphor while still remaining confident of its substance and reality.Escape for Tom means the suppression and denial of these emotions in himself, and it means doing great harm to his mother and sister.The magician is able to emerge from his coffin without upsetting a single nail, but the human nails that bind Tom to his home will certainly be upset by his departure.Clearly, Tom views his life with his family and at the warehouse as a kind of coffin—cramped, suffocating, and morbid—in which he is unfairly confined.The promise of escape, represented by Tom’s missing father, the Merchant Marine Service, and the fire escape outside the apartment, haunts Tom from the beginning of the play, and in the end, he does choose to free himself from the confinement of his life.The outside world is just as susceptible to illusion as the Wingfields.The young people at the Paradise Dance Hall waltz under the short-lived illusion created by a glass ball—another version of Laura’s glass animals.The play takes an ambiguous attitude toward the moral implications and even the effectiveness of Tom’s escape.As an able-bodied young man, he is locked into his life not by exterior factors but by emotional ones—by his loyalty to and possibly even love for Laura and Amanda.Thus, the fact that the play exists at all is a testament to the power that memory can exert on people’s lives and consciousness. is the first condition of the play.” The narrator, Tom, is not the only character haunted by his memories.Indeed, Williams writes in the Production Notes that “nostalgia . Amanda too lives in constant pursuit of her bygone youth, and old records from her childhood are almost as important to Laura as her glass animals.

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