Homework In Finland

Homework In Finland-37
Thinking back to our days at school, it can be hard to forget all that homework we had to do.The days may have been great most of the time, but sometimes it was like the school days would never end!New Delhi: Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat has hailed the education system of Finland as the best in the world, and asked India to take a cue from it.

Thinking back to our days at school, it can be hard to forget all that homework we had to do.The days may have been great most of the time, but sometimes it was like the school days would never end!New Delhi: Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat has hailed the education system of Finland as the best in the world, and asked India to take a cue from it.

Students are given a great deal of freedom, can pursue interests, and teachers are held up as shining examples to be emulated.

And this is a good system in a lot of ways: The Finnish system is excellent for a largely homogenous country in a relatively small area with a similar culture that values education. The Finnish system does not shine nearly so well for students who are unusual, largely because they don’t have a lot of them.

Yet somehow this country has managed to rank at number two in the world for their reading knowledge.

The schools in South Korea weren’t fully established until the last few decades when education became a majorly important part of the country.

Finnish children do not get any homework, something that most Indian children are burdened with.

Nor do Finnish schools have any standardised tests.

This means that schools in Japan only hand out around 3.8 hours of homework a week. No, most of the schools across the country don’t employ janitors. The students themselves are in charge of keeping the building clean and tidy.

So while Japanese school might not overload their pupils with extra work, they are preparing them for plenty of other skills they will need throughout their lives.

As if that wasn’t enough, children in Finland don’t have to start school until they are seven years old.

However, they are still able to come out near the top of the charts when it comes to their exam results. Rather than overloading children with work when they are home, Finnish parents trust that the teachers will give the children all the education they need while they are at school.

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